DeLombard, Jeannine Marie

Associate Professor

Education: 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
M.A., Yale University
B.A., Vassar College

Jeannine Marie DeLombard is Associate Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She specializes in African American and pre-1900 American literature, with a particular interest in identity and personhood at the intersections of slavery, law, and print publicity. Her most recent book, In the Shadow of the Gallows: Race, Crime, and American Civic Identity (Penn 2012), has been released in paperback; it serves as a prequel of sorts to her first book, Slavery on Trial: Law, Abolitionism, and Print Culture (UNC 2007). She is currently at work on her third book, The Indignities of Slavery: Race and Personhood in America.

 She has been honored to receive the Robert K. Martin Best Book Prize (2013); the Melville Society’s Hennig Cohen Prize for Best Work in Melville Studies (2009); and lifetime membership in the American Antiquarian Society (2009).  Current essays can be found in The Routledge Research Companion to Law and Humanities in 19th-Century America (forthcoming 2017); The Cambridge History of American Crime Fiction (forthcoming 2017); The Oxford Handbook of the African American Slave Narrative (Oxford 2014); The American Novel: 1870-1940,  vol. 6 of The Oxford History of the Novel in English (Oxford 2014); The New Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville (Cambridge 2013); A Companion to American Legal History (Blackwell 2013); and Early African American Print Culture (Penn 2012).

Professor DeLombard retains a status-only affiliation with the Department of English at the University of Toronto.

Contact

Office: 

South Hall 2721

Telephone: 

805-893-7489

FAX: 

(805) 893-4622

Email: 

jdelombard@english.ucsb.edu

Mailing Address: 

English Department
UC Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9580

Fields/Affiliations: 

American Literature
Post-Colonial Studies
American Race and Ethnic Studies

Research Interests: 

  • American Literature before 1900
  • Afro-diasporic Literature & Culture
  • Law, Culture, & the Humanities
  • Personal Narrative & Documentary Nonfiction

Recent Courses Taught